Used Chevrolet Tahoe

2015-Current

4th Gen Tahoe

4th-Gen-Chevrolet-Tahoe

The modern used Chevrolet Tahoe SUV has all the right moves. After a major redesign in 2015, the Tahoe is better than ever. Inside, it offers room for up to nine passengers, making it one of the best picks for big families on the road today. It’s also a great option for outdoor adventurers, because, with four-wheel drive, the Tahoe glides over rugged terrain. Under the hood, a 5.3-liter V8 engine generates 355 horsepower for a swift, smooth ride. Properly equipped, the Tahoe can tow max loads of 8,600 pounds.

The modern used Chevrolet Tahoe cabin treats you to more than just three spacious rows of seating. With the heated and ventilated front seats, you can brave any weather in complete comfort. The rearview camera makes backing up a snap, even with a sizeable trailer attached. High-tech safety gear, including forward collision alert, warns you of nearby danger. The rear entertainment system keeps young passengers content for hours on end.

2007-2014

3rd Gen Tahoe

3rd-Gen-Chevrolet-Tahoe

When you’re shopping the used market, the third-generation Tahoe makes an excellent option. These models deliver everything from generous passenger comfort to superb performance. Like the Tahoes that came before it, this one proved highly maneuverable, escorting passengers around tight parking lots and city grids with ease. If you plan to hit rugged terrain, look for models with four-wheel drive and other off-road-friendly features.

Inside, these SUVs weren’t just roomy – they offered an upscale experience. High-end features, like the navigation and premium audio systems, could’ve been found in a luxury SUV. Beginning in 2010, the Tahoe offered a USB port, making it easy to charge devices from the road. The third-generation Tahoe also made passenger protection a major priority. The OnStar telematics system boosted peace of mind, thanks to features like turn-by-turn navigation and on-demand roadside assistance.

2000-2006

2nd Gen Tahoe

2nd-Gen-Chevrolet-Tahoe

In its heyday, the second-generation Tahoe was the best SUV on the road. This model was known for its excellent maneuverability and V8 power. Shoppers could choose between two V8 engines, the most powerful of which was a 5.3-liter V8 that produced 295 horsepower. The Tahoe could also be had with four-wheel drive for premium performance on the trail. If you’re looking for an off-road-ready Tahoe, check out the Z71 model. In 2003, Chevrolet introduced an optional stability control system to enhance driver authority over difficult road conditions.

1995-1999

1st Gen Tahoe

1st-Gen-Chevrolet-Tahoe

The original Tahoe looked a bit different than it does today. Shoppers could choose between two- and four-door models. Two-door models used a unique engine – a 180-horsepower turbodiesel V8. Other Tahoes derived their power from a 5.7-liter V8 engine that produced 255 horsepower. Inside, there was plenty of room for up to six passengers. In addition to being roomy, the cargo hold offered major space for golf clubs and road trip luggage.

Used Chevrolet Spark

2013-Current

1st Gen Spark

1st-Gen-Chevrolet-Spark

When it comes to interior comfort, the modern used Chevrolet Spark has plenty to offer. Its four-door design gives all passengers easy access to plush, roomy seating. If you want to take comfort to the next level, look for used models with leatherette upholstery. The Spark also keeps you cozy throughout the winter months, with heated seating in addition to the regular central system. All in all, the Spark puts passenger comfort high on its list of priorities.

Choose from three well-equipped trim models – the LS, 1LT, and 2LT – for the level of luxury you crave. Inside, the Sonic boasts features like the 7-inch touchscreen interface, which makes it easy to access MyLink infotainment apps. Connect your smartphone to the system via Bluetooth phone and audio connectivity. From there, you can make hands-free calls and stream your music collection through the central infotainment system. As you can see, the Sonic cabin offers major appeal for gadget-loving drivers.

Because used Chevrolet Spark models are relatively new, you can count on cutting-edge safety equipment. The OnStar telematics system offers major protection, solving unexpected issues with features like stolen vehicle tracking and on-demand roadside assistance. Newer versions of this system also come with a Wi-Fi hotspot, providing a strong connection to the Internet wherever you go.

Beneath the hood, the modern used Chevrolet Spark balances compliant performance with money saving fuel economy. The 1.2-liter four-cylinder engine provides a sporty ride, with 84 horsepower and 83 pound-feet of torque. It’s paired with a five-speed manual transmission, so you always feel like you’re in complete control of your ride. Alternatively, you can look for models with the continuously variable transmission, which provides a smooth, comfortable trip. No matter which powertrain you prefer, the Sonic still earns nearly 40 mpg on the highway. The Spark is a great pick for drivers with fuel economy on the brain.

Used buyers will find a few differences between model years. When the Spark debuted in 2013, it offered a four-speed conventional automatic transmission that was tuned for maximum fuel economy. In 2014, the automatic was replaced with a continuously variable transmission (CVT) for enhanced performance and fuel economy. Still, fuel-conscious drivers will find that the manual transmission offers the best EPA ratings overall.

Chevrolet CPO Warranties

Six-Year/100,000-Mile Powertrain Limited Warranty

Today’s certified pre-owned (CPO) Chevrolets come with a newer, longer six-year/100,000-mile powertrain limited warranty. During those first six years – or 100,000 miles, whichever comes first – you’ll enjoy complete peace of mind as you cruise up and down the highway. If something happens and your vehicle does need work, you’ll enjoy courtesy transportation until you get your Chevrolet back from the shop. No matter what happens, this warranty has your back. Best of all, you won’t have to worry about a thing, because the warranties zero-dollar deductible means there’s no need to dip into your savings.

12-Month/12,000-Mile Bumper-to-Bumper Limited Warranty

In addition to powertrain coverage, your certified used Chevrolet gets a bumper-to-bumper limited warranty. During the first 12 months or 12,000 miles – whichever comes first – you’ll enjoy zero-deductible fixes on a number of problems. Chevrolet’s bumper-to-bumper coverage is the icing on the cake, ensuring that your used vehicle feels brand new for months on end. Both warranties are transferrable to subsequent owners, too, which is an added selling point if you decide to resell your recent purchase.

As you can see, Chevrolet CPO warranties come in handy when you need them most. The benefits of purchasing a certified used Chevrolet are so great that you shouldn’t even consider buying any other kind of used vehicle. With this kind of coverage, you’ll cruise around town with complete confidence. There’s no need to worry about the integrity of your used model, because you know it passed a 172-point inspection. If anything does go wrong, warranty coverage offers a quick, zero-deductible fix.

Hyundai vs Kia

Hyundai and Kia have a lot in common. Both manufacturers are based in South Korea and, after Kia filed for bankruptcy in 2007, Hyundai took over a part of their corporation. As a result of this union, many Kia and Hyundai models share some of the same underlying components. In spite of this relationship, the two companies are two distinct companies with different strengths. So how are they different? Read our comparison guide to learn more about how to distinguish these two brands.

Hyundai vs Kia

Luxury vs. Youthful Style

When you line up these automakers’ offerings side by side, it’s easy to tell them apart. Hyundais tend to have curving, flowing exterior design, while Kias are simpler. Kias are sporty, but not quite as refined-looking. Hyundais also extend that refinement to the interior, with high-quality materials and upscale features that appeal to luxury-minded buyers. Best of all, they provide all of this value at an excellent price. Kias cabins aren’t quite as luxurious, but they, too, aim to please with solid comfort at an affordable rate.

Infotainment Technology

Hyundai’s Blue Link system makes you feel like it exists purely for your convenience. It makes life easier with emergency telematics options – for example, if something unexpected happens and your engine overheats, you can use its on-demand roadside assistance function to quickly call for a tow. Blue Link also keeps you connected with hands-free calling and music streaming options.

Kia’s Uvo infotainment is geared less toward convenience and more toward smartphone integration. Its Apple CarPlay and Android Auto technology displays apps like Maps and Messages on the central touchscreen. If you’re the type who finds your smartphone hard to resist, these features will help you get through your commute with maximum safety.

Reputation

As the older brand, Hyundai is more established than Kia. Hyundais have been sold in North America for a longer period of time, and customers have come to know them as the automaker that delivers classy comfort and long-term dependability. Although it was once plagued with a less-than-savory reputation, Kia has really re-emerged as a heavy hitter in the economy market. That said, Kias don’t really supply the same upscale comfort and high-quality performance that you get with a Hyundai.

Conclusion

When it comes down to it, we think that Hyundai is the automaker to beat. Although both nameplates provide high-quality comfort, Hyundais feel more luxurious. Hyundai’s reputation also precedes it, giving buyers dependable, upscale vehicles for years.

2017 Hyundai Tucson vs Toyota RAV4

Along with the Honda CR-V, the Toyota RAV4 is one of the best-selling SUVs in the world, and has been for some time now. However, competition is coming from all areas these days, not the least South Korea, so let’s compare the 2017 Hyundai Tucson with the Toyota RAV4 to see how these two crossovers compare.

2017 Hyundai Tucson vs Toyota RAV4

Styling

Some people won’t like the way the Hyundai Tucson looks, but it’s hard to believe that will describe very many. The Tucson may be a bit more conventional than its predecessor, but it’s also handsome, stylish, modern, sporty, and even more than a little premium-looking. It’s now looks like a smaller Santa Fe, but, if anything, the Tucson is even more attractive.

The RAV4 seems to be evolving before our eyes, with so many redesigns and refreshes over the years. It’s almost as if Toyota knows it still hasn’t got the exterior styling quite right, but keeps trying to improve it. The Toyota isn’t an ugly vehicle at all, but its looks are not in the same class as those of the Hyundai.

Power & Performance

A 2.0-liter inline-four producing 164 horsepower is the base engine in the Tucson, which comes mated to a six-speed automatic transmission. A more sophisticated 1.6-liter turbo-four is the alternative, which then gets you as much as 175 horsepower and is paired to a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission. Front-wheel drive is standard with all-wheel drive available with both units.

If we put the hybrid RAV4 to one side as a separate model, that only leaves a single engine in the regular model. That engine is a 2.5-liter inline-four that comes matched to a six-speed automatic transmission and produces 176, which can feel strained when pushed with a full load.

Interior

Apart from front leg room, the interior of the Hyundai Tucson is larger than the cabin of the Toyota RAV4 by almost every measure. The Tucson boasts an impressive 133.2 cu.-ft. of passenger volume, although cargo space isn’t anywhere near as generous as some rivals. The design of the dash and the way the controls are laid out is superb, although the quality of materials does vary.

With just 101.9 cu.-ft. of cargo volume, the RAV4 is no match for the Tucson, but its 73.4 cu.-ft. of cargo space with the rear seats down is much better than the Hyundai’s 61.9 cu.-ft. The new Platinum trim level elevates the comfort and quality of the Toyota to another level, but not having anywhere near as much passenger volume stops it doing better than the Hyundai.

Features & Equipment

Hyundai is a manufacturer synonymous with value for money, so it’s expected that the Tucson offers high levels of standard features. You won’t get a lot of a la carte choice, though, as features tend to be trim level specific, with only the Limited model offering flexibility for adding distinctive options. Base models get all the usual power features, as well as cruise control, air conditioning, automatic headlights, a rearview camera, and a 5.0-inch touchscreen for the included infotainment system.

An entry level RAV4 comes standard with 17-inch alloy wheels, power features, air conditioning, a tilting-and-telescoping steering wheel with audio and phone controls, cruise control, interior LED lighting, a 12-volt power outlet and very good infotainment system. The XL then adds the likes of dual-zone automatic climate control, a sunroof, and fog lights, so the Toyota just has the edge when it comes to standard features and equipment.

Learn More about the Hyundai Tucson

Even if the Toyota RAV4 was better than the 2017 Hyundai Tucson in every other way, we’d choose the Hyundai for its looks alone. But the Hyundai is at least a match for the Toyota in every other way, and better than it in quite a few. Add to the equation the fact the Tucson is almost $2,000 cheaper than the RAV4, and you won’t be surprised to learn the Tucson is our favorite of the pair.

2017 Hyundai Tucson vs Honda CR-V

Compact SUVs are the answer for drivers who need extra space and ground clearance but refuse to live the minivan lifestyle and aren’t ready for full size truck or SUV. Compact SUVs are a compromise–but they’re a great one that delivers the space and design you want. Two of the top models in this class are the 2017 Hyundai Tucson and the Honda CR-V. Which one will give you all of the things you want?

2017 Hyundai Tucson vs Honda CR-V

Convenience

Convenience is important–your car is supposed to make your life easier. The CR-V delivers with features that give you options. The HondaLink app allows you to turn on and off your car remotely so that you can cool it down on those hot summer days before you get there. You can use it for scheduling maintenance and get reports on how your vehicle is doing. You can connect your smart phone to the touch screen wirelessly with both Apple Car Play and Android Auto. The built-in HomeLink also allows you to connect to your garage door without having an extra external remote.

The Hyundai Tucson sports these same features as well, except for HondaLink which is replaced with MyHyundai. The Tucson also has a Smart Lift Gate for the trunk. Instead of opening it by hand, by kicking your foot under the car or by pushing a button, the smart lift gate automatically opens when the key is sensed standing behind the car within three feet for more than three seconds. This feature comes in handy when your hands are full. With this added feature and the fact that the rear seats recline, the Tucson comes out ahead in convenience.

Interior Space

If you just look at seating, the Tucson and the CR-V are equal. They both seat five with two in the front and three in the back. The Tucson has a good amount of space. It has 41.5 inches of front seat legroom and 38.2 inches of back seat legroom. In cargo space, the Tucson has 31 cubic feet of cargo space, which can be extended to 61.9 cubic feet when the second row is folded down.

The CR-V has a little bit more interior space than the Tucson. The front row leg room is barely smaller by less than a quarter of an inch. But the back adds a couple of inches, . with 40.4 inches of legroom. Cargo space is really where the CR-V pulls away in this category. The CR-V has 39.2 cubic feet of storage that extends to 75.8 cubic feet with the seats folded down. So if you are a tall family, that’s something to consider.

Safety

When it comes to safety, crash ratings are going to be good no matter what vehicle you choose. Nowadays, it all comes down to extras. The Honda CR-V has both a Collision Mitigation and Road Departure Mitigation system to help you stay on the road and to keep you from crashing. These systems will sense an upcoming accident and help prime the brakes and begin to apply them if you fail to do so. On long highway trips, lane departure mitigation will also keep you in your lane when you’re drifting.

The Tucson also has an automatic braking system that will engage if there’s an imminent collision, including pedestrian detection. The Lane Keep technology in the CR-V is just a lane departure warning in the Tucson, but is makes up for it with an extra feature-rear cross traffic alert. This feature is invaluable when trying to back out of a crowded parking lot. It helps you avoid pulling out in front of someone flying down the aisle when other cars block your line of sight.

Warranty

A warranty provides a peace of mind. You know that if something goes wrong, things will be taken care of. A warranty also gives you an indication of when things might start to happen. After all, the manufacturer doesn’t want to spend money fixing your stuff if they don’t have to. The Honda comes with a respectable 3 year/36,000 mile limited new car warranty and a 5 year/60,000 mile powertrain warranty. This warranty is fairly standard.

The Hyundai Tucson, though, comes with America’s best warranty.The Hyundai warranty is considered the best because it is the longest manufacturer warranty out there. You’ll get a 5 year/60,000 limited new car warranty and a 10 year/100,000 mile powertrain warranty. That’s coming close to double the amount of the standard warranty by most other manufacturers. With a guarantee like that, you can drive away with that peace of mind you need.

Learn More about the Hyundai Tucson

In this side-by-side comparison, priorities matter. If you’re an NBA star, the CR-V would be a better choice because of the leg room. If you are looking for a compact SUV that has extra safety features, a little more convenience, and a stellar warranty, then the 2017 Hyundai Tucson is the obvious choice.

2017 Hyundai Tucson vs Kia Sportage

To get around town in style, with fuel economy and elbow room to spare, check out compact crossovers like the 2017 Hyundai Tucson and Kia Sportage. In addition to family-friendly features, these models are adventure-friendly, with all-wheel drive and towing capabilities. Read our comparison guide to learn which of these two models floats your boat.

2017 Hyundai Tucson vs Kia Sportage

Family-Friendly Comfort

Load up the whole family in the Tucson, and there’s still elbow room to spare. That’s the kind of space everyone appreciates on long road trips. This roomy crossover is also celebrated for its attractive cabin, which includes high-quality materials and a clean-cut dash design. Buttons and controls on the dash are logically arranged, making for a straightforward experience.

For this segment, the Sportage also offers outstanding passenger space and comfort. Both rows are 6-footer-friendly, with excellent thigh support to boot. The cabin will remind you of a mid-size crossover – it’s that spacious. However, we prefer the Tucson’s clean-cut dash layout and attractive cabin. The Sportage cabin is competitive, but doesn’t feel quite as upscale.

Safety

In government crash tests, the 2017 Hyundai Tucson impresses a perfect five-star rating for overall protection. The Blue Link telematics system supplies everything you could want in an emergency, from roadside assistance to emergency crash notification. Add the Ultimate package, and driver aids like blind-spot monitoring will alert you to danger. The forward collision warning system can detect pedestrians and automatically apply the brakes to help you skirt danger.

The Kia Sportage also landed a perfect five-star rating in government crash tests. It, too, offers an emergency telematics system, making it easy to call for help with a stolen vehicle or unexpected breakdown. However, with the Sportage, you have to purchase the top-trim Sportage SX Turbo to get high-tech driver aids like blind-spot monitoring.

Tech & Convenience

No matter where you wander, the Sportage tech lineup keeps you connected. Starting with the mid-grade EX, the Sportage comes with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. This smartphone technology lets you check texts, hands-free, or use your phone’s Map app in lieu of the navigation system.

As in the Sportage, the Tucson’s central touchscreen is quick to respond to your touch, so you won’t be left jabbing at it in anger. You’ll also appreciate little conveniences like the auto-dimming rearview mirror, which reduces glare after hours. You can also get Apple CarPlay and Android Auto for complete smartphone integration, but only on top-trim SE Plus and Limited models.

Power & Performance

In this competition, the 2017 Hyundai Tucson delivers the thriftiest performance, earning up to 26 city/32 highway mpg. It also tows up to 1,500 pounds, so you can haul your Jet Ski to the bay every weekend. Add all-wheel drive to increase traction, and the Tucson keeps its footing on light trails and wet roads.

In the Kia Sportage, you can tow up to 2,000 pounds, which may make it the right pick for buyers who own two Jet Skis. However, you can expect to pay a little more at the pump, because the Sportage’s max EPA ratings are 23/30 mpg.

Learn More about the Hyundai Tucson

In the 2017 Hyundai Tucson, you’re getting the star treatment at a cut rate. That’s why it’s our overall pick for family-style comfort and performance. More than a roomy road trip and impressive fuel economy, though, the Tucson keeps you connected with innovative tech features. Cutting-edge safety gear monitors your surroundings for danger, and can even help when the unexpected happens. On the road, this crossover is confident and capable.

2017 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport vs Toyota RAV4

As Hyundai continues to unveil more and more upscale and exciting vehicles, it also has to keep upgrading existing models for them to keep up with the rapid pace of development. This year has seen the 2017 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport getting the refresh treatment, so let’s see how it now stacks up against one the big names of the compact crossover segment, the Toyota RAV4.

2017 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport vs Toyota RAV4

Styling: Hyundai Santa Fe Sport

In the 2017 model year, the Santa Fe Sport benefits from a new front fascia, headlights, trim panels, taillights and rear fascia–so, basically, a lot has changed at least on the surface. The Santa Fe Sport now looks a lot more like the Tucson, which itself was substantially updated just last year. The Santa Fe was already the best-looking SUV in the Hyundai range, and the latest updates have only reinforced that fact.

The Toyota RAV4 has also just been updated and refreshed, although the majority of that work has been focused on the interior in response to customer feedback. On the outside, the RAV4 isn’t going to win many beauty contests–and, if we’re honest, we might be a little flummoxed about how this design could be so popular among so many buyers.

Interior Space and Comfort: Hyundai Santa Fe Sport

The Santa Fe Sport offers a decent amount of passenger and cargo space, with 108 cu.-ft. of total passenger volume. Good leg and head room in the front and the back, a sliding second-row seat, and a flat-folding front passenger seat make the interior immensely flexible. The materials are good, if not class-leading, the seats are comfortable, and the cabin is quiet.

Toyota has worked hard to improve the RAV4, but the LE and XLE models at the lower end of the trim range can still feel a little sparse. Toyota has added some nice features such as new hard-wearing imitation leather called SofTex, but the interior of the Santa Fe Sport is still a little more welcoming.

Power and Performance: Hyundai Santa Fe Sport

Two engines are available for the Santa Fe Sport: the base engine is a normally aspirated 2.4-liter inline-four that develops 185 horsepower but the better choice is probably the 2.0-liter turbo-four which puts as much as 240 horsepower at your disposal. Both engines are mated to a six-speed automatic transmission, which also has a manual shift mode actuated by the shift lever, and all-wheel drive is available.

Unless you want to go down the hybrid route, the only conventional engine in the RAV4 is a 2.5-liter inline four producing a relatively modest 176 horsepower. That engine comes mated to a six-speed automatic transmission, and the powertrain can feel a little overwhelmed when trying to cope with a full load of passengers and cargo.

Fuel Economy: Toyota RAV4

The standard engine of the Hyundai Santa Fe Sport is rated at 21 mpg in the city, 27 mpg on the highway and 24 mpg combined, while the more powerful 2.0-liter turbo gets as good as 20/28/23 mpg in front-drive form.

Even without going as far as the hybrid engine option, the RAV4 can offer 23 mpg in the city, 30 mpg on the highway and 26 mpg combined with front-wheel drive, so this round goes to the Toyota.

Learn More about the Hyundai Santa Fe Sport

The Toyota RAV4 continues to deliver impressive sales, but the refreshed 2017 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport is definitely worth considering if you don’t want to follow the crowd. The Santa Fe Sport is more powerful than the RAV4, has a better interior, has a very similar set of standard and available features, and we think it’s a better buy than the Toyota at the moment.

2017 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport vs Nissan Rogue Sport

Small crossover SUVs, like the 2017 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport and Nissan Rogue Sport, are prime picks for thrifty commuters and tech-savvy socialites alike. They combine a sporty ride with impressive fuel economy, and they’re packed with all the latest infotainment options. Which is the crossover for you? Read our comparison guide for more info.

2017 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport vs Nissan Rogue Sport

Cabin Comforts

In this segment, the Santa Fe Sport leads the way with its high-quality materials and classic style. The dash layout is straightforward, putting oft-used controls within easy reach of the driver seat. And, perhaps more importantly, the cabin is plush and spacious, supplying both rows of passengers with the head and leg room they require for long-term comfort.

When you test-drive the Nissan Rogue Sport, you’ll enjoy soft cushioning that fares well on long commutes. This crossover also supplies a smooth, quiet ride on every family road trip. We just wish the Rogue Sport was a tad bit more luxurious – the Santa Fe Sport offers a classier take on comfort.

Technology

Smartphone lovers will thrive in the 2017 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport. The 7-inch touchscreen is easy to use, with large graphics to help you avoid fat-fingering the wrong app. And, thanks to Android Auto and Apple CarPlay technology, you can use your phone’s voice controls through the central system. Just ask, and the system can read your text messages or display your Maps app on the central touchscreen.

For an economy crossover, the Nissan Rogue Sport offers an impressive array of tech features. It also features a 7-inch touchscreen that’s quick to respond to your requests. If you’ve got an iPhone, you’re in luck, because the Rogue Sport’s Siri Eyes Free technology lets you talk to your smartphone as you head down the road. However, if you’re looking for expanded Android features, you’re going to have to shop elsewhere.

Safety

For an extra sense of security, choose the Santa Fe Sport. It earned a perfect five-star overall rating in government crash tests. On top of that, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety gave its forward collision mitigation system a rare score of “Superior.” This technology doesn’t just warn you of danger – it applies the brakes to help you avoid it.

The Rogue Sport also delivers cutting-edge driver aids. For example, the blind-spot alert helps you switch lanes safely. Both models provide emergency telematics services, so you can solve unexpected issues with features like on-demand roadside assistance. The Rogue Sport wasn’t rated in government crash tests, but it comes standard with all the basic safety features, including anti-lock brakes and airbags.

Power & Performance

If you’re looking to pinch pennies at the pump, give the Nissan Rogue Sport a spin. It earns up to 25 city/32 highway mpg. This sporty crossover also provides a taste of adventure. Add all-wheel drive, and you can take your Rogue Sport onto light trails, such as at campsites and beaches, without getting stuck.

The 2017 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport earns up to 21/27 mpg, which isn’t bad when you consider its quick acceleration. As with the Rogue Sport, you can add all-wheel drive to the powertrain for enhanced grip on soft surfaces, such as icy pavement.

Learn More about the Hyundai Santa Fe Sport

These crossovers have a lot in common – including a sporty ride – but the 2017 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport won us over. For starters, we love the its creature comforts. No matter how long the ride, you’ll have enough space and plenty of cushioning. Tech features, including smartphone integration, keep you connected in a hands-free fashion. On the road, this crossover is more than smooth and composed – it’s fuel-efficient and quick on its feet.

2017 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport vs Honda CR-V

Don’t overspend on a crossover SUV – enjoy stylish comfort and generous tech features in budget-friendly models like the 2017 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport and Honda CR-V. In addition to attractive MSRPs, these crossovers give you a comfortable, fuel-efficient daily commute. Which model is right for you? Our comparison guide is here to help you figure things out.

2017 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport vs Honda CR-V

Comfort & Convenience

The Santa Fe Sport is the clear-cut winner – it might be affordable, but nothing in the cabin gives it away as such. High-quality cabin materials give you the luxury treatment. Plush, supportive seating provides comfort, all the way to work and back.

The Honda CR-V’s smooth, quiet ride belies a much more expensive model. Throughout the cabin, the supportive seats get two thumbs up. If there’s one catch, it’s that the continuously variable transmission can get loud during hard acceleration, cutting down on refinement on the highway.

Utility

For forays into the great outdoors, the Santa Fe Sport will serve you well. Its all-wheel-drive capabilities will send you down light trails with maximum traction. Tow up to 3,500 pounds’ worth of boat to your favorite weekend fishing spot – no problem.

Like the Santa Fe Sport, the CR-V offers a sporty ride with its all-wheel-drive technology. If you live in a wet climate, you’ll also find that all-wheel drive enhances safety during rain and snowstorms. The Santa Fe Sport can tow up to 1,500 pounds – which will do just fine for Jet Ski owners but doesn’t match the Santa Fe Sport’s capacity.

Fuel Economy

To increase savings at the pump, check out what the CR-V has to offer. Depending on which powertrain you select, the CR-V earns up to 28 city/34 highway mpg. (http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/PowerSearch.do?action=noform&path=1&year1=2017&year2=2017&make=Honda&baseModel=CR-V&srchtyp=ymm) It’s also got pep, with enough speed to deliver a capable, predictable performance.

The Santa Fe Sport earns up to 21 city/27 highway mpg, a fairly typical performance in this class. (http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/PowerSearch.do?action=noform&path=1&year1=2017&year2=2017&make=Hyundai&baseModel=Santa%20Fe&srchtyp=ymm) It balances fuel ratings with plenty of muscle. In addition to the Santa Fe Sport’s towing capabilities, you’ll also enjoy a strong, smooth ride.

Safety

The Santa Fe Sport puts you and your passengers first. In government crash tests, this crossover shows its worth with a perfect five-star rating for overall protection. (https://www.nhtsa.gov/vehicle/2017/HYUNDAI/SANTA%252520FE%252520SPORT/SUV/FWD) It also earned the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety’s top score of “Good” in every single crash test. The forward collision warning system earned a rare “Superior” from the IIHS. When this technology senses an imminent crash, it springs into action, applying the brakes to help you come to a quick stop.

The Honda CR-V also gets high marks from the IIHS, earning the Top Safety pick distinction and a Superior as well. ( http://www.iihs.org/iihs/ratings/vehicle/v/honda/cr-v-4-door-suv/2017) However, Honda’s active safety features have had some owners complaining of glitches and overactivity, which can cause problems where none exist. We’re giving the nod to the Hyundai in this category.

Learn More about the Hyundai Santa Fe Sport

The 2017 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport surpasses the Honda CR-V with its tow-friendly ride and smooth acceleration. Inside, the Santa Fe Sport feels spacious and stylish. As you cruise across state lines and into your next adventure, the whole social crew will enjoy the head and leg room they need, the technology you need to stay connected, and the safety rating to keep you driving with confidence.