2017 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport vs Honda CR-V

Don’t overspend on a crossover SUV – enjoy stylish comfort and generous tech features in budget-friendly models like the 2017 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport and Honda CR-V. In addition to attractive MSRPs, these crossovers give you a comfortable, fuel-efficient daily commute. Which model is right for you? Our comparison guide is here to help you figure things out.

2017 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport vs Honda CR-V

Comfort & Convenience

The Santa Fe Sport is the clear-cut winner – it might be affordable, but nothing in the cabin gives it away as such. High-quality cabin materials give you the luxury treatment. Plush, supportive seating provides comfort, all the way to work and back.

The Honda CR-V’s smooth, quiet ride belies a much more expensive model. Throughout the cabin, the supportive seats get two thumbs up. If there’s one catch, it’s that the continuously variable transmission can get loud during hard acceleration, cutting down on refinement on the highway.

Utility

For forays into the great outdoors, the Santa Fe Sport will serve you well. Its all-wheel-drive capabilities will send you down light trails with maximum traction. Tow up to 3,500 pounds’ worth of boat to your favorite weekend fishing spot – no problem.

Like the Santa Fe Sport, the CR-V offers a sporty ride with its all-wheel-drive technology. If you live in a wet climate, you’ll also find that all-wheel drive enhances safety during rain and snowstorms. The Santa Fe Sport can tow up to 1,500 pounds – which will do just fine for Jet Ski owners but doesn’t match the Santa Fe Sport’s capacity.

Fuel Economy

To increase savings at the pump, check out what the CR-V has to offer. Depending on which powertrain you select, the CR-V earns up to 28 city/34 highway mpg. (http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/PowerSearch.do?action=noform&path=1&year1=2017&year2=2017&make=Honda&baseModel=CR-V&srchtyp=ymm) It’s also got pep, with enough speed to deliver a capable, predictable performance.

The Santa Fe Sport earns up to 21 city/27 highway mpg, a fairly typical performance in this class. (http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/PowerSearch.do?action=noform&path=1&year1=2017&year2=2017&make=Hyundai&baseModel=Santa%20Fe&srchtyp=ymm) It balances fuel ratings with plenty of muscle. In addition to the Santa Fe Sport’s towing capabilities, you’ll also enjoy a strong, smooth ride.

Safety

The Santa Fe Sport puts you and your passengers first. In government crash tests, this crossover shows its worth with a perfect five-star rating for overall protection. (https://www.nhtsa.gov/vehicle/2017/HYUNDAI/SANTA%252520FE%252520SPORT/SUV/FWD) It also earned the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety’s top score of “Good” in every single crash test. The forward collision warning system earned a rare “Superior” from the IIHS. When this technology senses an imminent crash, it springs into action, applying the brakes to help you come to a quick stop.

The Honda CR-V also gets high marks from the IIHS, earning the Top Safety pick distinction and a Superior as well. ( http://www.iihs.org/iihs/ratings/vehicle/v/honda/cr-v-4-door-suv/2017) However, Honda’s active safety features have had some owners complaining of glitches and overactivity, which can cause problems where none exist. We’re giving the nod to the Hyundai in this category.

Learn More about the Hyundai Santa Fe Sport

The 2017 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport surpasses the Honda CR-V with its tow-friendly ride and smooth acceleration. Inside, the Santa Fe Sport feels spacious and stylish. As you cruise across state lines and into your next adventure, the whole social crew will enjoy the head and leg room they need, the technology you need to stay connected, and the safety rating to keep you driving with confidence.

2017 Hyundai Santa Fe vs Ford Escape

Midsize SUVs are perfect if you are looking for seating for five but with a little more power and capability than that of a compact SUV. Both the 2017 Hyundai Santa Fe and the 2017 Ford Escape fit the bill. Let’s take a look at them in our side-by-side comparison.

2017 Hyundai Santa Fe vs Ford Escape

Towing Capacity

One category in which a midsize SUV beats a compact is towing capability. The Ford Escape gives you a max towing capacity of 3,500 lbs of towing. Having this capacity gives you room to tow your favorite boat or water toys, turning your SUV into not only a capable family hauler but also an adventure mobile as well.

The Hyundai Santa Fe, however, boasts a 5,000 lb max towing capacity. So if you want to spring for the bigger boat motor and the larger deck space on the boat, the Santa Fe will allow for that. So, with 1,500 extra lbs of towing power, the Hyundai wins this category,

Safety

Nowadays,most crash test ratings are about the same in many vehicles, but what sets them apart is extra features. The Santa Fe’s Automatic Emergency Braking system senses when a crash is quickly approaching and applies the brakes when if you fail to so. The Lane Departure Warning alerts you when you are drifting off into the other lane so you can make a correction. The rear parking sensor lets you know if something is behind you when you’re backing up.

The Escape has similar features but most of them are automated so that human error can be eliminated. The Lane Keep System senses when you are drifting into the next lane and automatically makes the correction to keep you centered. The Forward Collision Warning with Brake Support senses when a frontal collision is coming, warns you, and then primes the brakes for a more immediate response. Finally, the Enhanced Parking Assist helps with parallel parking (finding a suitable spot, gives directions, and takes the wheel for you) and backing in to a perpendicular spot. Because of the automation in more areas, the Escape wins this round.

Convenience

If your car makes your life harder more than make it easier, its not worth it. The Ford Escape is equipped with FordPass which allows you to turn on or off your car, see diagnostic info, schedule maintenance appointments and more. The Sync 3 allows you to connect to your phone for easy, hands free calling, texting, and music streaming. Getting your stuff into the cargo area is made easier with a foot activated lift gate.

While the MyHyundai app is equivalent to the FordPass, the Santa Fe takes the rest a little bit farther. Equipped with both Apple Car Play and Android Auto, the Santa Fe allows you to connect to your iPhone or Android wirelessly and, in addition to making calls and texts, and streaming your music, you can run your phone’s apps through the in-dash touch screen. That means you have easy access to your maps, podcasts, Siri’s dry wit, and more. Finally, the Smart Lift Gate can open without hands, buttons, or kicking your feet under the truck. It opens automatically when you have the keys and are within three feet behind the car standing still for more than three seconds. This innovation is great for full hands and clumsy feet.

Warranty

One of the main reasons for buying new is the peace of mind that comes with a manufacturer’s warranty. Ford offers a standard 3 year/36,000 mile limited new car warranty. That means if something breaks in that time, Ford will take care of it. They also give you a 5 year/60,000 mile powertrain warranty. This warranty covers you, but often for not as long as you are making payments on your vehicle.

Hyundai, once again, takes it a little bit further. With a new Santa Fe, the limited new car warranty is 5 years/60,000 miles and the powertrain warranty is for 10 years/100,000 miles. This just goes to show Hyundai’s confidence in their vehicles, their workmanship, and quality of parts. With that kind of guarantee, you can drive away with both a new car and peace of mind.

Learn More about the Hyundai Santa Fe

In this side-by-side comparison, the Hyundai Santa Fe clearly comes out on top. If a better warranty, more towing capability, and a higher convenience aren’t enough, the Santa Fe looks sportier than the Ford. Ultimately, when you’re buying a midsize SUV, you want the total package–power, performance, and panache. You’ve got it all in the 2017 Hyundai Santa Fe.

2017 Hyundai Santa Fe vs Honda Pilot

Although full-size and compact crossovers are doing seriously good business right now for their manufacturers, midsize models are where the majority of family buyers look for their next do-it-all vehicle. Putting three rows of seating into a midsize challenges designers to be clever with space so the occupants aren’t too cramped inside, so let’s take a look at how the 2017 Hyundai Santa Fe and the Honda Pilot match up against each other.

2017 Hyundai Santa Fe vs Honda Pilot

Styling

Family buyers who don’t care about style will probably still go for a minivan, but the overwhelming majority of them do care about it and that’s why models like these are so popular. The Santa Fe has had a mid-cycle refresh this year that’s almost entirely aesthetic, and the enhancements to the bumpers and lights have delivered a notably more contemporary look to the Hyundai.

The current Pilot has left behind the boxy shape of the past and soft corners and rounded fenders are now the order of the day. It’s a model you know is a crossover and not a truck-based SUV just by looking at it, and the balance between sheet metal and glass is just right. We’ll give the edge to the newer Hyundai, but the Honda is right behind.

Interior Comfort

The interior is all-important for the success of a vehicle like the Santa Fe, and although it’s one of the smaller models in its class, the Hyundai delivers big on interior space and versatility. The seats are better bolstered and more comfortable than previous models, noise and vibration is kept to a minimum, and the overall quality is very good, especially at SE Ultimate trim and beyond.

It’s a very similar story with the Honda Pilot, and bit of Alcantara and some brushed aluminum trim is all that stops it infringing on true luxury. There’s a little more room inside the Honda than in the Hyundai, so the fact adults can actually use the third row just gives it the edge here.

Engine and Performance

For the moment there’s just one engine in the 2017 Hyundai Santa Fe, which is the 3.3-liter V-6 that develops 290 horsepower. It comes mated to a six-speed automatic transmission and it can be specified with either front or all-wheel drive. If you need to tow, the Santa Fe can handle as much as 5,000 pounds right out of the box. And there’s an Active Eco mode for saving a little gas too.

The Honda Pilot is also only available with a single V-6 powerplant, which is a 3.5-liter V-6 that produces 280 horsepower and can be had with a six or nine-speed automatic transmission, depending on trim level. The Pilot can also tow up to 5,000 pounds with all-wheel drive, but the lower horsepower means we give this section to the Hyundai.

Safety

Any vehicle aimed at families has to rate highly for safety and the Santa Fe certainly does just that in a very big way. The 2017 model beats its predecessor by getting the coveted Top Safety Pick+ rating from the IIHS, while the feds at the NHTSA give the Hyundai its full five-star rating for overall safety. The Hyundai offers automatic braking, lane departure warning, blind spot detection, and lane change assistance. The package that contains these features is available for even the base-level model.

With a wide-angle rearview camera standard on every model and EX, EX-L and Touring models also getting a right-side-view camera, the Honda is also very serious about safety. Like the Hyundai, the Pilot gets top scores from the IIHS and NHTSA, so this round also has to be a tie. The Pilot offers Honda Sensing, a package of safety features that offers similar options to the Hyundai, but that package is only available on the top three trims.

Learn More about the Hyundai Santa Fe

Honestly, the 2017 Hyundai Santa Fe and the Honda Pilot are incredibly similar–great vehicles with stellar safety records that offer three rows of seating and snazzy styling. Very small details help the Hyundai Santa Fe nose slightly ahead of the Pilot, including a recent styling refresh and more accessible safety features. The Santa Fe is a great vehicle, and you won’t be disappointed.

2017 Hyundai Veloster vs Mazda 3 5-door

In some ways it’s pretty hard to compare the 2017 Hyundai Veloster with any other car. After all, if you are going to try and find another model with one door on the driver’s side and two on the passenger side, you’re pretty much wasting your time. But if we ignore the unique door configuration for a moment, the Mazda 3 5-door is a sporty car of a similar size, so let’s see how these two will measure up against each other.

2017 Hyundai Veloster vs Mazda 3 5-door

Exterior Styling

It’s hard to properly categorize the 2017 Hyundai Veloster, but it’s probably fair to think of it as a compact sports coupe, albeit one with a quite unique door arrangement. The roofline, profile, and innovative layout are enough on their own without having to resort to additional exterior trim and adornments, so Hyundai has stayed away from bling and produced a very attractive car.

The 5-door probably isn’t the most attractive version of the Mazda 3, but that’s not necessarily a criticism since all versions of the little Mazda are really great-looking cars. It’s hard to side with any small car’s styling over the Mazda 3, but there’s just something about the three-door format and coupe styling that does give the Veloster a slight edge here.

Interior

The Veloster is a four-seat model, but cars of this size are rarely used for carrying a full complement of passengers on a regular basis so the way the rear seats can be folded for more cargo space is really useful. Access through that extra passenger door also makes life easier. There are lots of bins, cubbies, and nooks for stowing away smaller items too, and the overall quality is excellent for a car at this price.

Noise used to be an issue inside the Mazda 3, but the latest models have taken care of this. Even though it’s a little bigger than the Hyundai, it’s not exactly cavernous and there’s obviously been some cost-cutting with a mix of materials and plastics. The better quality of the Veloster gives Hyundai a win here then.

Features

You get a lot of standard features for your money with the Veloster. Even entry models come standard with features that include power features, an AM/FM/XM/CD audio system with Bluetooth audio streaming and a USB port, a rearview camera, steering-wheel audio controls, cruise control, air conditioning and 17-inch wheels.

The Mazda isn’t exactly sparse either when it comes to standard kit. All models include: air conditioning, power doors and windows, Bluetooth connectivity, a keyless ignition, a rearview camera, steering-wheel mounted stereo controls, internet radio streaming, and a 7.0-inch touchscreen for its infotainment controls. However, smaller 16-inch wheels hand another win to the Veloster.

Fuel Economy

You’d probably expect good fuel economy from a car the size of the Veloster, and you wouldn’t be wrong. Non-turbo models with the dual-clutch transmission get EPA ratings of 28 mpg in the city, 35 mpg on the highway and 31 mpg combined.

With its 2.0-liter inline-four and automatic transmission combination, the Mazda 3 5-door manages numbers as good as 28 mpg in the city, 37 mpg on the highway and 32 mpg combined, and that’s enough to give the victory to the Mazda.

Learn More about the Hyundai Veloster

The Mazda 3 looks great on the outside, but it’s a bit of a letdown when you get inside. There’s less room than you might expect, the materials are a real mix of quality, the infotainment system is a little dated, and the price can get a little steep. In contrast, the 2017 Hyundai Veloster offers sports car design and fun in a cohesive and unique design, with a good dose of practicality to make the driving experience as good as possible. The impressive Blue Link system is now standard, and the R-Spec Turbo really is a lot of fun to drive. The Mazda is good, but the Hyundai is better.

2017 Hyundai Sonata vs Kia Optima

Mid-size sedans, such as the 2017 Hyundai Sonata and Kia Optima, cater to families on the run with spacious cabins and thrifty fuel economy. Which model is right for your needs? Peruse our comparison guide to learn more.

2017 Hyundai Sonata vs Kia Optima

Creature Comforts

The Sonata puts your comfort first, with roomy, supportive seats and a smooth ride. It also just might be the quietest in its class, providing the kind of serene highway ride that you’d expect from a luxury car. Inside, the Sonata’s plush seats are perfect for commuters. They’re exactly where you want to be if rush-hour traffic can’t be avoided. You’ll also like its roomy trunk, with 16.3 cubic feet for major grocery hauls and sporting goods.

In the Kia Optima, you’ll find decent seating comfort for long trips. However, the lack of lateral support might be a deal-breaker for some. The drive isn’t quite as smooth as what you’ll find in the Sonata, but you can count on the Optima for a quiet ride.

Tech Features

The Sonata’s tech features are very user-friendly. Even if you’ve never dealt with infotainment technology before, you’ll have things sorted out in no time. Apple CarPlay and Android Auto connectivity display smartphone apps on the central touchscreen, so there’s no need to look down at your phone. You can even use Siri or Google voice controls to ask the system to reroute your Maps destination or read your texts.

The Optima also offers Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, giving you complete smartphone integration. If we had to choose, though, the Sonata’s Blue Link technology feels more intuitive than the Optima’s Uvo system. That said, once you get over the learning curve, you’ll enjoy easy access to apps like navigation.

Safety

In government crash tests, the Sonata scored a perfect five stars for overall protection. And, if that’s not enough to put your mind at ease, you’ll love its automatic forward collision emergency braking feature. When it senses an oncoming crash, it jumps into action to help keep you safe. All models come standard with Blue Link emergency telematics, which includes problem-solving features like roadside assistance and crash response.

The Optima also earned shining crash-test scores. It doesn’t come standard with emergency telematics features, but you can add all the same driver aids that are available on the Sonata. Lane departure warning, for example, lets you know if you need to correct your course.

Power & Performance

The Optima impresses with its swift ride and modern fuel economy. Depending on powertrain, this sedan earns up to 28 city/37 highway mpg. We’re also fans of the way it handles – you’ll be swinging around corners and down winding roads with the best of them.

The 2017 Hyundai Sonata follows close behind with up to 28/36 mpg. And, as we mentioned, it provides one of the most refined rides in this segment. At the wheel, the responsive steering boosts your confidence, especially when road conditions are less than ideal.

Learn More about the Hyundai Sonata

Both models have their finer points, but the 2017 Hyundai Sonata is our first choice. Inside, you’ll enjoy plush comfort and a smooth, quiet ride. Tech features provide the smartphone integration you need to stay connected – and also give you the power to do so without lifting a finger from the wheel. On the road, the Sonata is both frugal and capable while safety gear boosts your sense of security and even intervenes in the face of danger.

2017 Hyundai Sonata vs Mazda 6

Beyond the usual suspects of the midsize sedan segment, a rich vein of outstanding models are too often overlooked. Two examples of these, the 2017 Hyundai Sonata and the Mazda 6, offer quality and style along with a pricetag that buyers will love. Let’s take a look at how they compare.

2017 Hyundai Sonata vs Mazda 6

Styling: Mazda 6

Today’s Sonata is a long way from even the previous generation–it’s now a lot more modest, serious, and de-chromed than ever. If it wasn’t for the badge on the hood, the Sonata could easily be taken for a luxury model from the outside.

Everything is just right about the exterior styling of the Mazda 6. Muscular front fenders, a sloping roofline that’s not too extreme, and a reshaped grille all adds up to one of the best-looking sedans in this or any other segment. The Hyundai is an attractive sedan, but the Mazda 6 has the edge on the Hyundai and just about everyone else.

Interior Comfort: Hyundai Sonata

The Sonata offers plenty of room for passengers and cargo because although it’s marketed as a midsize, it’s actually classified as a large sedan. You’ll find plenty of room in the front and the back, lots of cubbies and storage spaces, and the trunk is large at more than 16 cu.-ft. An abundance of sound deadening also adds to the luxurious feel of the rejuvenated Hyundai.

The interior of the Mazda 6 has been improved over the years, and offers a decent amount of space inside. The sloping roofline does restrict rear head room for those of six foot and above. The quality of the materials and fit is on a par with the Hyundai, but the Sonata steals the victory with more leg room and a bigger trunk.

Engines and Performance: Hyundai Sonata

Hyundai offers three different four-cylinder engines for the Sonata: a naturally aspirated 2.4-liter, a turbocharged 2.0-liter, and an economical 1.6-liter turbo. The standard engine develops 185 horsepower, while the 2.0T ups the power ante with an impressive 245 horsepower and 260 lb.-ft. All units come mated to a six-speed transmission with Shiftronic manual controls, and all versions of the Sonata are strictly front-wheel drive.

The Mazda 6 drives and handles extremely well, and car lovers will embrace the fact that a stick shift is available beyond just the base model. However, with just one engine option rated as modestly as 184 horsepower, this round is a clear win for the Sonata.

Fuel Economy: Hyundai Sonata

Despite being a relatively large car, the Hyundai is pretty impressive when it comes to fuel economy. The best ratings come from the 1.6-liter turbo, which gets 28 mpg in the city, 36 mpg on the highway and 31 mpg combined.

With the six-speed manual transmission, the Mazda 6 is capable of delivering fuel economy as good as 26 mpg in the city, 38 mpg on the highway and 31 mpg combined. However, since most people will opt for the automatic, which gets a combined rating of 30mpg. It’s a slight edge, but that edge belongs to the Hyundai Sonata.

Learn More about the Hyundai Sonata

The choice here basically comes down to which style of sedan you prefer. If you like sleek and sporty, then the Mazda is the way to go, but if you want presence, gravitas and a luxury feel without a luxury price ticket, the Sonata is what you need. As the prices are almost identical we could easily declare this contest a tie, but the extra power offered by the 2017 Hyundai Sonata just gives it the advantage over the Mazda 6.

2017 Hyundai Sonata vs Honda Accord

It would be easy to go for a crossover instead if you’re looking at buying a midsize sedan these days–but only because the choice of midsize sedans is just so good right now that it’s genuinely difficult to choose one. It’s harder to find a bad sedan than a superb one right now, so let’s take a closer look at the 2017 Hyundai Sonata and the Honda Accord to see which is most deserving of your attention.

2017 Hyundai Sonata vs Honda Accord

Styling

When it was redesigned in 2015, the Hyundai Sonata took on a look that was probably a little more organic and sober than it had been in the past. A good deal of chrome was eliminated and the Sonata now has a more elegant, sophisticated, and handsome style all round. There’s a definite German influence in there, and that’s almost always a very good thing.

The Honda Accord got a mild refresh just last year, and there’s enough flair and style to keep it relevant for the time being. The Accord now well into its ninth-generation, and unless you opt for the coupe it is starting to look a little dull. The Sonata has a small edge in the styling department.

Features and Equipment

Hyundai shook off its bargain-basement persona a few years ago, but the amount of standard equipment it offers still makes its vehicles a great value. Standard equipment includes: a rearview camera, power features, 16-inch alloys, automatic headlights, and an infotainment system with AM/FM/XM/HD/CD audio, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, a 7.0-inch touchscreen, Bluetooth with audio streaming, and a USB port.

Honda could be accused of skimping on equipment and features in base models in previous years, but not anymore. Even the base LX model includes: dual-zone automatic climate control, 16-inch alloys, Bluetooth connectivity, a rearview camera, an 8.0-inch touchscreen infotainment system, a multi-angle rearview camera, and LED taillights. A few extra options, including streaming and entertainment options, give the Sonata the slight edge.

Interior Comfort

Although the 2017 Hyundai Sonata is marketed as a midsize, the EPA has it technically defined as a large sedan. The result is plenty of room inside for the driver and passengers, such as 45.5 inches of front legroom and an overall passenger volume of an impressive 106.1 cu.-ft., while there’s also a generous 16.3 cu.-ft. for cargo too. There are also loads of storage bins and cubbies for bits and pieces, so this really is a superb interior for families.

The latest Accord is smaller than its predecessor, but clever use has been made of the available interior space so it actually feels roomier. It’s still not as spacious as the Sonata though, with just 103.2 cu.-ft. of passenger room and 15.8 cu.-ft. of trunk space. The cabin is extremely quiet and comfortable, but the additional space in the Hyundai Sonata just gives it the win this time.

Performance

There are two engine options for the Sonata, which are a 2.4-liter inline-four and a 2.0-liter inline-four turbo. The standard engine develops a useful 185 horsepower, while the turbo ups the performance ante to 245 horsepower. The base engine is more than adequate for most buyers even though it isn’t hugely quick, but the 2.0-liter is smooth, powerful and very enjoyable.

The standard engine is the Accord is very similar to the Sonata’s as it’s also a 2.4-liter inline-four producing 185 horsepower. However, the optional engine for the Honda is a powerful 3.5-liter V-6 putting 278 horsepower at your disposal, which can be had with a six-speed manual or a six-speed automatic transmission and also features cylinder deactivation. This has to be a relatively easy win for the Honda Accord.

Learn More about the Hyundai Sonata

Nobody looking at buying a midsize sedan right now will dismiss the Honda Accord out of hand, and rightly so. But if you don’t want to follow the crowd, want something a little more interesting and with more space than the Accord, the 2017 Hyundai Sonata is definitely a great choice. The Hyundai is also a bit more affordable than the Honda at the entry level, so that tips the balance in its favor for us.

2017 Hyundai Sonata vs Ford Fusion

You’ll find some incredibly strong contenders in the mid-size sedan segment, especially among the non-luxury models. The Ford Fusion is undoubtedly one of the strongest of those contenders, but competition like the Hyundai Sonata has been closing in for some time. Its current seventh-generation is now a genuine rival to the Fusion, so let’s see how they compare.

2017 Hyundai Sonata vs Ford Fusion

Styling: Hyundai Sonata

Today’s Hyundai Sonata is a much more serious, straightforward, and premium-looking car than some of its chrome-trimmed predecessors, with an even more prestigious aura about it than the Fusion. If you’re paying attention, you’ll notice an undeniable German influence in its design, which it’s hard to see anyone complaining about these days.

The Ford Fusion has always been a design to beat in this segment, and this generation looks as good now as it did when it was launched. It’s probably fair to say it’s a more sporty and frivolous design than the more serious Sonata, which may appeal to some buyers.

Interior Space: Hyundai Sonata

Buyers wanting a good amount of passenger and cargo space are well served by the Sonata. Tall passengers will find lots of leg room and no head room problems in the back, since the Hyundai doesn’t have one of those sloping rooflines that can limit room in the back. Storage spaces and cubbies are everywhere, and the trunk offers a generous 16.3 cu.-ft.

With a total passenger volume of 102.8 cu.-ft., the Ford Fusion falls short of the Hyundai by 4.3 cu.-ft. and, although there is more rear leg room in the Fusion, it doesn’t offer as much head room or as much front seat leg room as the Sonata. The trunk volume is almost the same, but the Hyundai still has the edge.

Fuel Economy: Hyundai Sonata

Lots of midsize sedans are offering four-cylinder engines these days, but when it comes to fuel efficiency, the Sonata really does impress. The Sonata Eco is powered by a highly efficient 1.6-liter turbo-four mated to a dual-clutch transmission, and rated at 28 mpg in the city, 36 mpg on the highway and 31 mpg combined.

The Fusion is one of the more economical cars in its class, but the fact the best EPA figures it can manage are now 23 mpg in the city, 34 mpg on the highway and 27 mpg combined shows how impressive the Sonata is.

Power and Performance: Ford Fusion

All Sonata models are front-wheel drive, and the engine lineup is exclusively four-cylinder. The base engine is a 2.4-liter unit producing 185 horsepower, while the Sonata Sport has a 2.0-liter turbo developing a lively 245 horsepower. A six-speed automatic transmission is standard in all cases, and there’s currently no option for all-wheel drive.

The base engine in the Fusion is a little lower on power, compared to the entry level unit in the Hyundai, but there’s also a 1.5-liter turbo-four and a 2.7-liter V-6 turbo. The Hyundai has the power advantage with its four-cylinder engines, but the 325 horsepower of its V-6 and available all-wheel drive definitely gives a win here to the Fusion.

Learn More about the Hyundai Sonata

It’s hard to criticize the Ford Fusion since it has set the standard in the segment for years. But the fact that the 2017 Hyundai Sonata gives it such a run for its money tells you how much Hyundai has changed. You’d likely be happy with either one of these fine cars, but the Sonata costs less and offers a few extras that the Fusion doesn’t–which gives it an edge.

2017 Hyundai Ioniq vs Toyota Prius

While the Hyundai Ioniq is one of the newest hybrids on the market, the Toyota Prius one of the oldest. Hybrids are now becoming increasingly mainstream with more and more models coming to market all the time. But should you err on the side of history or the newest model? Let’s see how these two compare by putting them head-to-head.

Styling

From day one, hybrids have had a look all their own. When they first came out, they weren’t stylish, but they stood out. The Ioniq probably looks less like a hybrid from the outside than some, but its silhouette still has remnants of the traditional hybrid look. It’s not unattractive, by any means, but it looks like a hybrid.

The Prius has never been a good-looking car, but that didn’t matter when it was the only hybrid around. Buyers used to drive the Prius a a badge of honor to show how they were singlehandedly saving the environment. Times have changed though. The latest model looks like nothing else on the road, which isn’t a good thing for the Prius. This round is an easy win for the Hyundai.

Power & Performance

Until every model has a hybrid option, hybrids will largely be judged by their powertrains first and everything else second. The Ioniq Hybrid is far better and smoother than most of its hybrid competitors, and its electric and plug-in versions are even better. The hybrid pairs a single electric motor with a 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine for a combined power rating of 139 horsepower.

The 1.8-liter four-cylinder and the 53 kW motor power the Prius to a maximum of 121 horsepower, which is much lower than the previous generation’s 134 horsepower. The ride is now smooth and much better than it used to be, but when you look at these engines and take into account fuel efficiency, the Ioniq is triumphant again.

Interior

The Ioniq Hybrid has 96.2 cu.-ft. of passenger volume. If you go purely by the numbers, the interior of the Ioniq actually seems pretty spacious. While the comfort and quality is good, rear seat passengers shouldn’t be too tall or they won’t be enjoying that same comfort. A combination of the gradually sloping roofline and the battery positioned under the rear seat compromises the rear head room.

The outside of the Prius might be “unique” but the interior has gone far more conventional these days–a very good thing. The seats are more supportive and comfortable than ever. You’ll find more soft touch materials and even some of the cheaper plastics have some nice graining for the look you want.

Fuel Economy

Since most hybrids are so close when it comes to mileage, manufacturer focus should be on performance. Since EPA ratings are still all-important for cars like these, though, the Ioniq Hybrid is rated at 57 mpg in the city, 59 mpg on the highway and 58 mpg combined, which is impressive by anyone’s standard.

The Prius has always been first and foremost about fuel-economy, and the Two Eco version of the current model certainly keeps that going with figures of 58 mpg in the city, 53 mpg on the highway and 56 mpg combined. That’s good, but the better combined rating of the Hyundai puts it out in front.

Learn More about the Hyundai Ioniq

The Toyota Prius used to sweep the board when it came to hybrid cars, but, despite a recent redesign, the competition has caught up and passed the Toyota. The 2017 Hyundai Ioniq is proof, beating the Prius on its home ground of fuel economy as well as in several other key areas.

2017 Hyundai Ioniq vs Ford C-Max

If you’re not a fan yet or you’ve no interest in electric or hybrid vehicles, it’s time to get with the program. Whether its high-performance or fuel-efficiency that rings your bell, this is the way the future’s shaping up. While some manufacturers are falling firmly on the hybrid or the all-electric side of the fence, Hyundai and Ford are keeping their options open by offering both with their 2017 Hyundai Ioniq and Ford C-Max models. So, let’s take a closer look to see which is best.

2017 Hyundai Ioniq vs Ford C-Max

Powertrain

Hyundai has done something really neat here by offering the Ioniq as hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and all-electric formats. The hybrid will be the biggest-seller which is why it’s been launched first with the other two following later, and the EV’s availability is being limited mostly to California at first. These are not performance models by any means, but they are livelier than the heavier Kia Niro hybrid.

There’s no all-electric version of the C-Max right now, so choice is limited to a hybrid and a plug-in hybrid. There’s nothing inherently wrong with the way either performs, but these are hybrids that have been around a while and it’s a technology that’s rapidly changing and improving. The more contemporary systems in the Hyundai Ioniq have the edge here then.

Styling

It must have been tempting for Hyundai to come up with a design for the Ioniq that screams “look at me, I’m different.” Thankfully, the Korean automaker resisted that temptation and the Ioniq is ultimately conventional. It certainly doesn’t shout about being a hybrid or an EV, so it will definitely appeal to a wider audience than a couple of well-known rivals.

The Ford C-Max was originally designed as an upright MPV for the European market, and although it’s no sports car it’s a lot more likeable than some of its less conventional rivals. It’s part-hatchback, part-tall wagon and even part-small minivan–it doesn’t seem to know what it wants to be. The Hyundai takes the honors here again for being more definitive and decisive.

Fuel Economy

If fuel economy is your thing, the Ioniq comes in three flavors of green, greener, and greenest. The base Ioniq Blue model is expected to deliver EPA ratings of 57 mpg in the city, 59 mpg on the highway and 58 mpg combined, while the rest of the range comes in at 55 mpg combined. The plug-in ratings have yet to be released, while the Ioniq Electric is rated by the EPA as having a range of 124 miles on a single charge.

Despite being downgraded twice during its five-year lifespan, the C-Max is still the Blue Oval’s most efficient model. The conventional C-Max Hybrid is rated by the EPA at 42 mpg in the city, 37 mpg on the highway and 40 mpg combined, while the plug-in has an all-electric range of 20 miles and a mile per gallon equivalent (MPGe) of 88. This is another easy victory for the Hyundai then.

Interior

The styling of the Ioniq’s interior is fairly straightforward with plenty of places to put things, but the rear seats can be a little cramped for two taller passengers on a long journey. Some of the materials may look and feel a little odd, but that’s not through corner-cutting as they’re intentionally recycled or sustainable materials to fit with the car’s image and profile.

Thanks to its origins as a European MPV, the C-Max is very spacious and practical for such a compact car. If you want plenty of room but you don’t need a third-row seat, the C-Max is a good choice. The Ford just misses out on the 100 cu.-ft. of interior volume at 99.7 cu.-ft., which just keeps it in the compact segment instead of being classified as a midsize. This has to be a win for the Ford C-Max then.

Learn More about the Hyundai Ioniq

The Ford C-Max is a decent enough family car for those wanting lots of space and decent fuel economy without a third-row seat. However, the Ford is now starting to show its age and the 2017 Hyundai Ioniq is all-new and offered in more formats,giving buyers additional options. The Ioniq is clearly the better option.